Review: DARK IN DEATH (In Death #46) by J.D. Robb

Dark in Death

SHE’S BACK!!!

I have certain unwritten rules when it comes to my reviewing. As I have mentioned earlier, I don’t like reviewing the latest books in a series if I haven’t reviewed the earlier works too because it completely messes with what I plan on writing. However, all my rules go out the window and down the drain when it comes to the inimitable Ms Nora Roberts aka J.D. Robb. And they certainly don’t matter in the least if I love a book as much as I loved the 46th part of the In Death series, Dark In Death.

A woman gets murdered with an icepick in a movie theatre while watching the shower scene in Psycho. When Lieutenant Eve Dallas starts investigating, she is briefly stumped to find no apparent motive or suspects. When crime novelist Blaine DeLano arrives at Cop Central the next day to tell her that someone has been recreating the murder scenes from her bestselling series, Eve understands that she is up against a murderous fan. You would think knowing the profile of the next victim as well as the form taken by the perp to commit the murder should make this case a walk in the park for Lieutenant Eve Dallas and Detective Peabody. But Robb turns the plot into a thrilling chase with exciting subplots and a largely satisfying conclusion.

“A vid comes to you, even at you. It’s visual, it’s auditory, and can, of course, pull you in. Its purpose is to do just that, draw you into the world you see and hear. But a book? You go into it. There’s no visual or auditory other than what forms in your own mind. You visualize the characters, the scene, through the words. You, as reader, interpret the tone of voice, the colors, the movement as you physically turn the pages. Now you have a killer not just experiencing the story, not just replicating it, but living it. So you have to do the same, and that’s frustrating for a woman as reality-based as you. “And more,” he added, “with each killing she becomes a different character with a different motive, a different psyche.”

If it’s not glaringly obvious, I am a huge fan of the series. However, the last few books had majorly disappointed me. I felt like the plot was stuck and Ms Roberts seemed reluctant to take big risks when it came to the stakes involved in each case. I wouldn’t say that Dark In Death was a superb work of crime fiction. But it hit all the right chords with me, kept me up till 4 AM, laughing and reading as fast I could to find out who the killer was, and now writing this post, so I’m just delighted that the J.D. Robb I absolutely love is back. 😀

The plot, with its similarities to the pilot episode of Castle, had me hooked from the beginning. And the truth bombs Robb kept dropping about being a writer had me in splits and nodding my head as I recalled a post of hers I’d read recently. In it, Ms Roberts talks about writing from within a bubble, with no regard for the “chatter” she received from her readers on her work. It annoyed me initially but having made my own little forays into writing a book, I now completely get where she comes from.

She started to say she’d take coffee, then he distracted her. Just loosening his tie as he walked across the room to a fancy cabinet. Why was that sexy? she wondered. She didn’t even get why men insisted on wearing ties—and don’t get her started on Jenkinson. But the way Roarke loosened that knot, flipped open a couple buttons on the shirt? It was kick-in-the-guts sexy.

Now, what did I love the most? Eve and Roarke are ambitiously trying to have sex in every room of the house while Summerset’s on vacation. And they sit and read murder mysteries together in front of a fire in their home library! If it wasn’t for another one of those pesky rules, I would flood this post with all my highlighted quotes about their marriage and their chemistry. Roarke is a GOD among fictional men. Almost all of my favourite secondary characters make an appearance, and a new character is introduced that I hope to see a lot more of. Dark In Death was a delightful whodunit with a compelling and believable killer that made me ultra glad for having stuck with the series. As if I would have ever stopped.  😛

Lastly, I’m just gonna reiterate how effing happy I am to have fallen back in love with the In Death series. I can’t believe I have to wait until September for the next book.

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Exposed in Darkness (In Darkness #1) by Heather Sunseri

exposed-in-darkness

I am a Nora Roberts superfan. I have read and reread every one of her books and the woman redefined the genre of romance for me, whether it was between vampires and witches, or a super badass cop with a charming Irish billionaire. Right after I finished her latest, Echoes In Death,  I was left wanting more. Thankfully, I had a copy of Heather Sunseri’s foray into romantic suspense, Exposed in Darkness, and I am so happy to have found a new favourite author in the genre.

Brooke Fairfax left the FBI after the tragic death of her husband in an op that went south. Overpowered by grief and guilt, she cut off all ties with the Bureau until a message from her Confidential Human Source (CHS), Romeo, shows her the poisoning of Kentucky’s Lt. Governor. Believing the Governor, her ex-brother-in-law, to be the actual target, Brooke heads to Lexington to stop the threat.

Suspect number one: Declan O’Roark. Charming Irish billionaire with a passion for great bourbon and thoroughbreds. Despite being pursued by the feds, all Declan wants is to unravel the mystery that is Brooke and take away the pain she seems determined not to share with anyone. When a second attack results in the death of another innocent man, Declan and Brooke race to figure out who the mastermind is and how to stop him from committing an act of terrorism at the Bluegrass Derby.

At first glance, there are an awful lot of similarities between the iconic In Death series by Nora Roberts writing as J.D. Robb and Ms Sunseri’s new In Darkness series. But what sets this book apart is Ms Sunseri’s strong and complex sense of storytelling. Unlike Robb, Ms Sunseri gives us a peek into Declan’s mind and I loved it.  The location and history of the small Kentucky town truly make it a character of its own. The characters are motivated by a complicated web of culture, political, and socio-economic factors. In other words, Exposed in Darkness is both timely and realistic.

There is a really interesting climax scene that juxtaposes the Derby race with the final threat. While I found the big reveal to be slightly predictable, there were a lot of questions left unanswered and I, for one, am eagerly waiting for Ms Sunseri’s next book in the series. I would recommend this book to anyone who is a fan of the romantic suspense genre but especially to my fellow In Death superfans.

I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Review: ‘Obsession In Death’ (In Death #40) by J.D. Robb

Obsession in Death Cover

Before I write anything else, let me just say that I am a die-hard J.D. Robb/Nora Roberts fan. I have read almost every single book she has published so I was slightly surprised when I found out that there was a new In Death book out and I had no idea that it was even coming. Needless to say, I rushed to buy a copy and finished it in a night. As a rule, I had decided not to review books mid-series but here goes.

In Obsession In Death, the year 2060 is coming to an end and we see a very different Lieutenant Eve Dallas from how she was in Naked In Death (In Death #1). Happily married, Eve has solved a lot of high-profile murders for the New York Police and Security Department (NYPSD) and she is getting accustomed to being an object of attention, of gossip, of speculation.

But this time, she is the object of one person’s obsession. A person who thinks she is extraordinary, who believes they have a special relationship and that they are her ‘true and loyal friend’. Most importantly, this person has taken it upon themself to murder people who have slighted Eve in all her years as a cop. And if you know Eve, that is a really long list. Fighting to keep the investigation in her own hands, Eve is treading a very thin line, trying to find a murderer who knows her methods while she races to keep everyone she values safe. And Eve knows that under the offer of friendship and admiration, the biggest threat is to herself.

I found the premise of the book very interesting but the actual story was a slight let-down because I feel after 40 books, Robb is not taking much risks with what she has figured is a winning formula. The usual characters of Detectives Peabody and McNab, Captain Feeney and the rest of her squad along with her friends Mavis, Nadine Furst, Doctor Mira, Chief Medical Examiner Morris and others are simply there to make Eve realise that she has come a long way from being a snarky badass loner in the past. And of course, there is Roarke, her gorgeous Irish billionaire husband, the love of Eve’s life, a man so perfect that you know nothing bad will ever happen to him in the In Death universe.

The victims of this admirer include a defense attorney that Eve had butted heads against in a couple of past cases and a junkie informant who had once smacked Eve in the face. There are multiple attempts on people really close to Eve but nothing actually happens. This book fails to pack the punch that, say, Conspiracy In Death or New York In Dallas did. The pace of the book is impossibly slow and after a while I really started getting annoyed at the lack of action.

In the end, I’d say Obsession In Death was not one of J.D. Robb’s better works but it gave a nice overview of how Lieutenant Eve Dallas’s life has changed positively since the beginning of the series because she has now laid her past to rest and filled her life with amazing (and why always gorgeous?) people. So, basically, good chick-lit but slightly below-average crime-fiction. Because I am a fan, I’d recommend it to other people who already love the series but for people who have never read an In Death book before, this is really not a good place to start.